Archive for the ‘Aristean calendar’ Category

Coincidences in my life – Part 1

WP 093

COINCIDENCES IN MY LIFE – PART 1©

ARISTEO CANLAS FERNANDO
Peace Crusader and Echo of the Holy Spirit

 

All the names below—Aristaeus, Artemis, Apollo, and Echo—are names in Greek mythology which have been associated with me.  Those in parentheses are quoted from The World Book Dictionary.

  1.  Aristaeus – “the son of Apollo and the water nymph Cyrene, famous as a keeper of bees”.   He received instruction from the Muses in the arts of healing and prophecy.  He is the guardian of herds and fields and was represented as a young man dressed like a shepherd and sometimes carrying a sheep.

My name is Aristeo.  It came from the Hispanized Greek god Aristaeus which may be from the Greek word aristo meaning ‘best’.

  1.  Artemis – “the goddess of the hunt, of the forests, of wild animals, and of the moon.  She was the twin sister of Apollo and was called Diana by the Romans.” 

This is the name of the computer fourth generation database program that I used when I worked in Saudi Arabia (1985-1988) and at BHP Steel in Australia (1989-1992).

  1. Apollo – “the god of the sun, poetry, music, prophecy, healing, and archery.  The Greeks and Romans considered Apollo the highest type of youthful, manly beauty.”  He is the son of Leto and twin brother of Artemis.

This is the name of the model of the family’s second car in Australia (1994 to present, 2012).  It is made by Holden (General Motors) and is a rebadged Toyota Camry.

  1. Echo – “a nymph who pined away with love for Narcissus until only her voice was left”.

This is the name of the model of the second-hand Toyota economy car that I used in commuting between home and work at the Department of Defence at Bulimba in Brisbane (2006-2008), a distance of about 40 km each way.  It is still running and has been lent to my daughter in Melbourne in 2011. 

After I bought the car in 1986, I realized that I am just echoing the Holy Spirit, that is why from then on, I say that I am the ‘Echo of the Holy Spirit’.  I recommended the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) by our team in the Department of Defence in Sydney (2004-2006) for correct spelling of purchase order number, names of people, streets and suburbs, etc.  Echo is IPA’s code name of the letter E.

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Coincidences in my life – Part 3

WP 095

COINCIDENCES IN MY LIFE – PART 3©

ARISTEO CANLAS FERNANDO
Peace Crusader and Echo of the Holy Spirit

 

The number of Jesus

The number of Jesus is 888.  How did we know this?  The name of Jesus in Greek is ΙΗΣΟΥΣ (iota, eta, sigma, omicron, upsilon, sigma).  The Greeks had a numbering system called the Greek Ionic Ciphered Numeral System devised in about the year 300 B.C. whereby each letter of the Greek alphabet is assigned a numerical value.  Substituting the numerical values to each letter in the name of Jesus and adding them up, the total is 888.  The values of the letters are: iota, 10; eta, 8; sigma, 200; omicron, 70; upsilon, 400; and sigma, 200.  The sum of 10 + 8 + 200 + 70 + 400 + 200 is 888.

Did you know that when the family arrived in Australia as immigrants, it was on 1988-08-21?  August is the eighth month of 1988; hence, 888.  This was the choice of wife of post office box number in Campbelltown, New South Wales in 1993 because of its significance of our arrival in Australia.  We even registered the Holden Apollo car with a special number plate FAF 888.  Yet, all this time, I did not know that the number of Jesus is 888.

It was in May 1994 just before my 25th Wedding Anniversary when the first cousin of my first cousin (Anthony Castelo) arrived in Australia that I only learned about it.  I had not met him for about 35 years.  I read it in the book that he was reading titled A Scientific Approach to Biblical History by W. W. Faid which he lent to me overnight.

In July 1994, one year and five months after we got the post office box, I discovered that our box was in the middle of a cross.  There were four boxes to the left, to the right, to the bottom and three to the top.  Cross, Jesus, 888.  Then in December 1994, I discovered that the set containing box 888 was flanked to the right by a set where you may draw a cross also and to the left by a set where you may not draw a cross because the set contained small, medium, and large boxes.  The middle and the set to the right were all small boxes.  This reminds us of the crucifixion of Jesus wherein He was in the middle flanked by two thieves.

When we finally moved all our things from Campbelltown to Queensland on 2004-05-07, the post office rearranged the post office building from 2004-04-30 to 2004-05-02 affecting also the post office boxes.  Hence, you will not see this strange arrangement anymore.

For details about this and photos, please read http://aristean.org/jesus888.htm .

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Coincidences in my life – Part 2

WP 094

COINCIDENCES IN MY LIFE – PART 2©

ARISTEO CANLAS FERNANDO
Peace Crusader and Echo of the Holy Spirit

 

Aristean calendar

One may think that I am a conceited person because the perpetual calendar I am proposing is named after me.  True, it is named after me.  But why?  I will explain how the name came about towards the end of the article.  And to put the record straight, I am NOT a conceited person.

In 1992, the perpetual calendar was inspired to me (I believe from the only true God) while I was driving to work one January morning.  The inspiration was “31-30-30, start on Monday.”   ‘It must be a calendar’, I said to myself.  

When I arrived in the office, I immediately drew up the calendar with twelve months divided into four quarters.  Each quarter have three months.  Then I made seven vertical columns for each month for the week starting on Monday.

I made each first month of the quarter, January, April, July, and October, with 31 days, starting the month on Monday and the 31st day, on Wednesday.  The second months of each quarter are February, May, August, and November, with 30 days, starting the month on Thursday and the 30th day, on Friday.  The third months of each quarter are March, June, September, and December, with 30 days, starting the month on Saturday and the 30th day, on Sunday.   The total is 364 days only.  It is short for I know that an ordinary or common year has 365 days, and a leap year has 366 days. 

To maintain that the year starts on Monday, the 365th day must be a neutral day, not a regular named day of the week.  So should the Leap Year Day be.

Being a computer programmer, I designated the 365th day as December 31.  A day should have a date even though it is not assigned any day of the week.  This was easy to do.  The hardest was designating when the Leap Year Day be.  It took me months to decide.  I was leaning towards November 31st.  Finally, in the third quarter of the year, I decided that it should be on June 31st to divide the year equally into two. 

When it was first published on 1992-11-03 in Fairfield Advance, it was plainly designated as Perpetual Calendar.  So was it on its television debut on National Nine News on 1992-12-02.  Later, in about 1994 or 1995, it was named Fernando Perpetual Calendar.  And on 1997-03-13, it became known as the Aristean calendar.

Here are the coincidences that I am saying regarding the calendar.  My name is Aristeo.  It is the Hispanized of the Greek god Aristaeus.  In the Greek language, the root word of Aristaeus is aristo, which means number one or best.  Comparing the Aristean with other calendar proposals, it can easily be seen that it is really the best.  Number one!  Numero uno!

The name of my mother is Gregorian, which is similar to the presently-used Gregorian calendar.  Pope Gregory XIII promulgated this calendar in 1582.  The name of my maternal grandmother is Julita, which is similar to the Julian calendar.  Julius Caesar introduced this calendar in 46 B.C.  The parallelism or correspondence is striking: Gregorian, Gregorian calendar; Julita, Julian calendar.  They are even in the same order!  And now, I find myself proposing a calendar to replace the Gregorian.  It is still an association with calendars.

I have noticed that it is the first names of my mother and my grandmother that are related to our calendar.  This is the reason why I used my first name in naming the calendar I am proposing.

The house number of the upper floor of the house where I lived in Manila is 1583.  The house number of the lower floor is 1579.  Where is 1581?  The significance of 1583 is that it follows 1582, the year when the Gregorian calendar was promulgated by Pope Gregory XIII.  It may mean that the next calendar after the Gregorian calendar will be the Aristean calendar. 

To know more about the Aristean calendar, please click here.

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Perpetual calendar

PERPETUAL CALENDAR©

ARISTEO CANLAS FERNANDO
Peace Crusader and Echo

Table number for years 1801 to 2100 in the Gregorian calendar

1801

3

 

1853

5

 

1901

1

 

1953

3

 

2001

0

 

2053

2

1802

4

 

1854

6

 

1902

2

 

1954

4

 

2002

1

 

2054

3

1803

5

 

1855

0

 

1903

3

 

1955

5

 

2003

2

 

2055

4

1804

16

 

1856

11

 

1904

14

 

1956

16

 

2004

13

 

2056

15

1805

1

 

1857

3

 

1905

6

 

1957

1

 

2005

5

 

2057

0

1806

2

 

1858

4

 

1906

0

 

1958

2

 

2006

6

 

2058

1

1807

3

 

1859

5

 

1907

1

 

1959

3

 

2007

0

 

2059

2

1808

14

 

1860

16

 

1908

12

 

1960

14

 

2008

11

 

2060

13

1809

6

 

1861

1

 

1909

4

 

1961

6

 

2009

3

 

2061

5

1810

0

 

1862

2

 

1910

5

 

1962

0

 

2010

4

 

2062

6

1811

1

 

1863

3

 

1911

6

 

1963

1

 

2011

5

 

2063

0

1812

12

 

1864

14

 

1912

10

 

1964

12

 

2012

16

 

2064

11

1813

4

 

1865

6

 

1913

2

 

1965

4

 

2013

1

 

2065

3

1814

5

 

1866

0

 

1914

3

 

1966

5

 

2014

2

 

2066

4

1815

6

 

1867

1

 

1915

4

 

1967

6

 

2015

3

 

2067

5

1816

10

 

1868

12

 

1916

15

 

1968

10

 

2016

14

 

2068

16

1817

2

 

1869

4

 

1917

0

 

1969

2

 

2017

6

 

2069

1

1818

3

 

1870

5

 

1918

1

 

1970

3

 

2018

0

 

2070

2

1819

4

 

1871

6

 

1919

2

 

1971

4

 

2019

1

 

2071

3

1820

15

 

1872

10

 

1920

13

 

1972

15

 

2020

12

 

2072

14

1821

0

 

1873

2

 

1921

5

 

1973

0

 

2021

4

 

2073

6

1822

1

 

1874

3

 

1922

6

 

1974

1

 

2022

5

 

2074

0

1823

2

 

1875

4

 

1923

0

 

1975

2

 

2023

6

 

2075

1

1824

13

 

1876

15

 

1924

11

 

1976

13

 

2024

10

 

2076

12

1825

5

 

1877

0

 

1925

3

 

1977

5

 

2025

2

 

2077

4

1826

6

 

1878

1

 

1926

4

 

1978

6

 

2026

3

 

2078

5

1827

0

 

1879

2

 

1927

5

 

1979

0

 

2027

4

 

2079

6

1828

11

 

1880

13

 

1928

16

 

1980

11

 

2028

15

 

2080

10

1829

3

 

1881

5

 

1929

1

 

1981

3

 

2029

0

 

2081

2

1830

4

 

1882

6

 

1930

2

 

1982

4

 

2030

1

 

2082

3

1831

5

 

1883

0

 

1931

3

 

1983

5

 

2031

2

 

2083

4

1832

16

 

1884

11

 

1932

14

 

1984

16

 

2032

13

 

2084

15

1833

1

 

1885

3

 

1933

6

 

1985

1

 

2033

5

 

2085

0

1834

2

 

1886

4

 

1934

0

 

1986

2

 

2034

6

 

2086

1

1835

3

 

1887

5

 

1935

1

 

1987

3

 

2035

0

 

2087

2

1836

14

 

1888

16

 

1936

12

 

1988

14

 

2036

11

 

2088

13

1837

6

 

1889

1

 

1937

4

 

1989

6

 

2037

3

 

2089

5

1838

0

 

1890

2

 

1938

5

 

1990

0

 

2038

4

 

2090

6

1839

1

 

1891

3

 

1939

6

 

1991

1

 

2039

5

 

2091

0

1840

12

 

1892

14

 

1940

10

 

1992

12

 

2040

16

 

2092

11

1841

4

 

1893

6

 

1941

2

 

1993

4

 

2041

1

 

2093

3

1842

5

 

1894

0

 

1942

3

 

1994

5

 

2042

2

 

2094

4

1843

6

 

1895

1

 

1943

4

 

1995

6

 

2043

3

 

2095

5

1844

10

 

1896

12

 

1944

15

 

1996

10

 

2044

14

 

2096

16

1845

2

 

1897

4

 

1945

0

 

1997

2

 

2045

6

 

2097

1

1846

3

 

1898

5

 

1946

1

 

1998

3

 

2046

0

 

2098

2

1847

4

 

1899

6

 

1947

2

 

1999

4

 

2047

1

 

2099

3

1848

15

 

1900

0

 

1948

13

 

2000

15

 

2048

12

 

2100

4

1849

0

 

 

 

 

1949

5

 

 

 

 

2049

4

 

 

 

1850

1

 

 

 

 

1950

6

 

 

 

 

2050

5

 

 

 

1851

2

 

 

 

 

1951

0

 

 

 

 

2051

6

 

 

 

1852

13

 

 

 

 

1952

11

 

 

 

 

2052

10

 

 

 

 

Common Year (1900 and 2100 are not leap years)

Table

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

0

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

1

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2

2

5

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

3

3

6

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

4

4

0

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

5

5

1

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

6

6

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

 

Leap Year (every four years; 2000 is a leap year)

Table Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

10

0

3

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

11

1

4

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

12

2

5

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

13

3

6

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

14

4

0

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

15

5

1

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

16

6

2

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

 

DIRECTIONS: 

  1. Get the table number for the year.  If the year is a common year, the table number consists of only one digit; if a leap year, two digits.
  2. Get the constant to use for the month.
  3. Add the constant to the date to get the sum. 
  4. Divide the sum by 7 and note down the remainder. 
  5. The remainder determines the DOW.  If it is 0, it is Sunday; 1, Monday; 2, Tuesday; 3, Wednesday; 4, Thursday; 5, Friday; 6, Saturday.

Examples: 

  1. 1844-06-20 (June 20, 1844)
    1. The table number for 1844 is 10.
    2. The constant for June 1844 is 5.
    3. The sum of 20 + 5 = 25.
    4. 25/7 = 3 remainder 4.
    5. June 20, 1844 was a Thursday.

2.  1950-05-23 (May 23, 1950)

  1.  The table number for 1950 is 6.
  2. The constant for May 1950 is 0.
  3. The sum of 23 + 0 = 23.
  4. 23/7 = 3 remainder 2.
  5. May 23, 1950 was a Tuesday.

3.  2011-02-05 (February 5, 2011)

  1.  The table number for 2011 is 5.
  2. The constant forFebruary 2011 is 1.
  3. The sum of 5 + 1= 6.
  4. 6/7 = 0 remainder 6.
  5. February 5, 2011 is a Saturday.

File:  033-perpetual.htm     URL:  http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/033-perpetual.htm
First uploaded:  2009-08-26     Last updated:  2009-08-26     Rev. No. 0

Copyright © 2009 Aristeo Canlas Fernando
All rights reserved.

Constants to use during the 21st century

CONSTANTS TO USE DURING THE 21ST CENTURY©

ARISTEO CANLAS FERNANDO
Peace Crusader and Echo

 

Constants to use for each month of the year from 2001 to 2100

Year

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

2001

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2002

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2003

2

5

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2004

3

6

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2005

5

1

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2006

6

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2007

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2008

1

4

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2009

3

6

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2010

4

0

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2011

5

1

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2012

6

2

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2013

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2014

2

5

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2015

3

6

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2016

4

0

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2017

6

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2018

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2019

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2020

2

5

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2021

4

0

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2022

5

1

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2023

6

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2024

0

3

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2025

2

5

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2026

3

6

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2027

4

0

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2028

5

1

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2029

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2030

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2031

2

5

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2032

3

6

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2033

5

1

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2034

6

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2035

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2036

1

4

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2037

3

6

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2038

4

0

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2039

5

1

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2040

6

2

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2041

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2042

2

5

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2043

3

6

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2044

4

0

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2045

6

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2046

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2047

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2048

2

5

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2049

4

0

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2050

5

1

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2051

6

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2052

0

3

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2053

2

5

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2054

3

6

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2055

4

0

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2056

5

1

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2057

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2058

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2059

2

5

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2060

3

6

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2061

5

1

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2062

6

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2063

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2064

1

4

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2065

3

1

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2066

4

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2067

5

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2068

6

2

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2069

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2070

2

5

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2071

3

6

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2072

4

0

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2073

6

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2074

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2075

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2076

2

5

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2077

4

0

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2078

5

1

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2079

6

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2080

0

3

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2081

2

5

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2082

3

6

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2083

4

0

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2084

5

1

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2085

6

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2086

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2087

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2088

2

5

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2089

4

0

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2090

5

1

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2091

6

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2092

0

3

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2093

2

5

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2094

3

6

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2095

4

0

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2096

5

1

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2097

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2098

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2099

2

5

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2100

3

6

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

 

For example, determine the day of the week (DOW) of 2009-08-23.

The constant to use for August 2009 is 5.  The steps are:

  1.  Add the constant for the month to the date.  (5 + 23 = 28)
  2. Divide the sum by 7.  (28/7 = 4 remainder 0)
  3. The remainder determines the DOW.  If it is 0, it is Sunday; 1, Monday; 2, Tuesday; 3, Wednesday; 4, Thursday; 5, Friday; 6, Saturday.

 

File 032-21c.htm     http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/032-21c.htm
First uploaded:  2009-08-26     Last updated:  2009-08-26     Rev. No. 0

Copyright © 2009 Aristeo Canlas Fernando
All rights reserved.

How to determine the day of the week (DOW)

.

HOW TO DETERMINE THE DAY OF THE WEEK (DOW)©

ARISTEO CANLAS FERNANDO
Peace Crusader and Echo

Most of us, most likely, use a calendar table to determine the day of the week (DOW) in the Gregorian calendar.  Fair and simple.  However, in the absence of such calendar table, how can we determine the DOW of today’s date, 2009-08-23, for example?

I would like to share with you my way without using any calendar table, just calculating mentally.  It is not for any century or any year of the Gregorian calendar.  The constant is the number of blank spaces before the first of the month from and including Monday, for the current month only because this is what affects me most.  For August 2009, the first of the month falls on a Saturday.  Therefore, there are five blank spaces before the first, which is the contant for the month.  This is for calendars in which Monday is the first column of the week or the week starts on Monday, like in Europe, which follows the ISO Week Date.  In the USA, I think it is Sunday.  Here in Australia, it is mixed — either Sunday or Monday.  Nothing is official yet with regards to this.

The constant to use this August 2009 is 5.  Here are the steps:

  1.  Add the constant for the month to the date.  (5 + 23 = 28)
  2. Divide the sum by 7.  (28/7 = 4 remainder 0)
  3. The remainder determines the DOW.  If it is 0, it is Sunday; 1, Monday; 2, Tuesday; 3, Wednesday; 4, Thursday; 5, Friday; 6, Saturday.

Another way to do this:

  1. Divide the date by 7.  (23/7 = 3 remainder 2)
  2. Add the constant for the month to the remainder to get the sum.  (5 +2 = 7)
  3. The sum determines the DOW.  If it is 1 or 8, it is Monday; 2 or 9, Tuesday; 3 or 10, Wednesday; 4 or 11, Thursday; 5 or 12, Friday; 6 or 13, Saturday; 7, Sunday.
  4. In Step 3, if the sum is 7 or more, subtract 7 from the sum to get the difference.  (e.g., 10 – 7 = 3)   The difference then determines the DOW.   Like in the preceding way, if it is 0, then it is Sunday; 1, Monday; 2, Tuesday; 3, Wednesday; 4, Thursday; 5, Friday; 6, Saturday.

Corresponding months are months that start the month on the same day of the week.  During common years, in the Gregorian calendar, they are:

January and October
February, March and November
April and July
September and December
No months correspond to May, June and August

Corresponding months during leap years in the Gregorian calendar are:

January, April and July
February and August
March and November
September and December
No months correspond to May, June and October

The constants for 2001 to 2020 in the Gregorian calendar are:

 

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

2001

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2002

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2003

2

5

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2004

3

6

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2005

5

1

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2006

6

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2007

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2008

1

4

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2009

3

6

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2010

4

0

0

3

5

1

3

6

2

4

0

2

2011

5

1

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2012

6

2

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2013

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2014

2

5

5

1

3

6

1

4

0

2

5

0

2015

3

6

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

2016

4

0

1

4

6

2

4

0

3

5

1

3

2017

6

2

2

5

0

3

5

1

4

6

2

4

2018

0

3

3

6

1

4

6

2

5

0

3

5

2019

1

4

4

0

2

5

0

3

6

1

4

6

2020

2

5

6

2

4

0

2

5

1

3

6

1

 

The Gregorian calendar is not perpetual, hence, we have to know the constant to use for each month of a year. 

In the Aristean calendar, there are only three constants – 0, 3, 5 – for the first, second, and third months of the quarter of any year.  They exclude, of course, December 31 (World Peace Day) and June 31 (Leap Year Day every four years) which are no-weekdays.

First month of the quarter (January, April, July, October) – 0
Second month of the quarter (February, May, August, November) – 3
Third month of the quarter (March, June, September, December) – 5

And we follow the first of the above three steps.

I also have the reverse of determining the date given the day of the week. 

Details are in http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/calendaridx.htm.

Let us get used to 0 as Sunday, 1 as Monday, 2 as Tuesday, etc.  Later, we will be “using a  simpler, common, and universal calendar” which is perpetual.

File:  032-dow.htm     http://www.geocities.com/peacecrusader888/032-dow.htm
First uploaded:  2009-08-24     Last updated:  2009-08-24     Rev. No. 0

Copyright © 2009 Aristeo Canlas Fernando
All rights reserved.

THREE HOLIDAYS PER YEAR TO CHOOSE FROM

 

By Aristeo Canlas Fernando
Peace Crusader and Echo

 

 

How would you like to have three holidays per year totaling 29 calendars days using only ten days of your annual leave?  You may take one, two, or all three holidays.

 

This is possible in the Aristean calendar as shown in the schedules below:

 

1.  You may take your first holiday during the ten-day New Year Holiday (or World Peace Holiday) from December 29, Saturday, to January 7, Sunday, using only four annual leave days.

 

NEW YEAR HOLIDAY (WORLD PEACE HOLIDAY)

(10 calendar days including 4 working days)

 

December 29, Saturday – Weekend

December 30, Sunday – Weekend

December 31, World Peace Day – Public Holiday

January 1, Monday – New Year’s Day – Public Holiday

January 2, Tuesday

January 3, Wednesday

January 4, Thursday

January 5, Friday

January 6, Saturday – Weekend

January 7, Sunday – Weekend

 

2.  More than four months later, you may have your second holiday during the Christmas holiday using only three annual leave days.  This nine-day Christmas holiday is from Saturday, May 17, to Sunday, May 25.

 

CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY

(9 calendar days including 3 working days)

 

May 17, Saturday – Weekend

May 18, Sunday – Weekend

May 19, Monday

May 20, Tuesday

May 21, Wednesday

May 22, Thursday – Christmas Eve – Public Holiday

May 23, Friday – Christmas Day – Public Holiday

May 24, Saturday – Weekend

May 25, Sunday – Weekend

 

3.  And three months later comes the Resurrection holiday.  You may avail of this third holiday using only three annual leave days.  The holiday is from Saturday, August 10 to Monday, August 19. 

 

RESURRECTION HOLIDAY

(10 calendar days including 3 working days)

 

August 10, Saturday – Weekend

August 11, Sunday – Weekend

August 12, Monday

August 13, Tuesday

August 14, Wednesday

August 15, Thursday – Crucifixion Day – Public Holiday

August 16, Friday – Burial Day – Public Holiday

August 17, Saturday – Weekend (actual crucifixion date of Jesus)

August 18, Sunday – Weekend

August 19, Monday – Resurrection Day – Public Holiday

 

(Note:  Jesus rose from the dead [resurrected] after being buried for three days and three nights in a tomb on the present Sunday evening but which already is Monday evening in the Aristean Decimal Time wherein the day starts at 6 pm.)

 

File:  threeholidays.htm                  First uploaded:  20081103

 

Copyright © 2008 Aristeo Canlas Fernando

All rights reserved.